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A dirty blonde little slavegirl

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A peak into the very random mind an owned little slavegirl. Part academic, part artist, part aerialist, completely His. Pictures of me are tagged with "me", i try to avoid reblogging photos that aren't posted by the copyright holder, or haven't included an artist's credits.*Please do not copy or save our pictures - you do not have permission and this is copyright infringement. You are free to reblog them just please keep the credits and source.


poeteyes:

Never judge because it’s not your place.

poeteyes:

Never judge because it’s not your place.

— 2 hours ago with 138 notes
"I survived because the fire inside me burned brighter than the fire around me."
Joshua Graham (via mourningmelody)
— 2 hours ago with 181 notes
How to Cope with Flashbacks →

onlinecounsellingcollege:

Flashbacks are memories of past traumas. They can occur in a number of different forms – as sounds, images, smells, body sensations, numbness (or a lack of sensations). Often they’re accompanied by a feeling panic, where the individual feels trapped and completely powerless. Flashbacks can also…

— 2 hours ago with 201 notes
ptsdconfessions:





Become knowledgable about PTSD
What causes PTSD:
Emotional abuse // Psychological Trauma // Bullying // Rape & sexual abuse // Natural disasters // Sudden death of a loved one // War // Witnessing a traumatic event // Kidnapping // Vehicle accidents // Physical abuse // and many other things
Symptoms of PTSD // Myths & Facts about PTSD // DSM 5 Criteria for PTSD // Complex PTSD
Overcoming PTSD is not a black and white process and it will take time. Try not to hold high expectations for yourself such as ‘If I do such and such I’ll be cured overnight!’. Unfortunately there is no magic cure for PTSD, but there are things we can do to help.Remember that not every technique will work for everyone.
Therapy & MedicationTypes of therapy:
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Dialectical Behaviour Therapy // DBT for managing PTSD // How DBT can help trauma survivors
EMDR // Can you benefit from EMDR?
Demonstration of a therapy appointment // Step-by-step how to get a therapist // Differences between types of therapists
Tips on picking a therapist // 50 signs of good therapy  // 50 warning signs of bad therapy
Online Therapy:
Blah therapy - costs $25+ per session to talk to professionals, can talk to everyday people for free.
7 cups of tea - free as far as I can tell, but the people you talk to aren’t professionals, anyone can become a ‘listener’ after doing the short online class. This site is good as you can browse through all the ‘listener’ profiles to find someone who suits your time schedule and someone who has more experience with what you are going through.
Online therapy - $349 for 8 weeks to access their full services.
Anxiety online - can’t tell if it’s free or not.
E-therapy - the people you talk to are registered therapists, costs money but you have to make an enquiry to find out how much
Talk Space - free to begin with, then $25+ per week
Antidepressants and how they work // Medication for combat PTSD
Self Help BooksThe Courage to Heal // The Way of the Journal // Healing from Trauma
Flashbacks, Dissociation & Anxiety
Start meditation and do mindfulness exercises (each word is a different link). Utilising these techniques can help with anxiety in general as well. The more you practice them, the easier it will be to use them in times of high stress/anxiety.
Grounding worksheet
Make a grounding box
Mental grounding exercises // Physical grounding exercises // Soothing grounding exercises
How to cope with flashbacks // More on coping with flashbacks
Fidget toys can be great to use. They can distract you when you feel triggered or have high anxiety. Basically just have a small object you can fiddle with whilst going about your daily activities. These objects can be small stones, tangle teezers, koosh balls, water snakes, blowing bubbles, cats cradle (can be made with string), magic loops, putty, fidget rings
More fidget toys
3 practices to calm an anxious mind
How to calm anxiety
6 quick breathing exercises
For flashbacks any of these are good techniques to practice: one, two, three
Dual awareness protocol (you just have to click show more at the bottom of the post)
If you get triggered during a class or somewhere similar, just leave. If you need to, just tell the teacher you are going to the nurse’s office or to the toilet. Take a walk around and try to do some breathing exercises. Apps can be great in this situation because they can be right there with you all the time.
Managing dissociation
Other Helpful ResourcesSurviving the holidays // Intimacy after trauma // Dissociation explained // Bullying forum (where you can talk about how bullying has affected you) // Self care after rape // Anxiety Self help // Why you aren’t bad for loving your abuser // Self care masterpost // Resources for male survivors // Help for men with PTSD // Emotions chart // Showering when you don’t feel up to it
Useful Apps & Websites
Use Super Better for anxiety (or anything else they have listed there)
SAM app - help for anxiety
PTSD Coach - helps you when you are triggered/having bad anxiety. It takes you through different exercises to calm you down according to how you are feeling (ie. feeling disconnected, worried, angry, unable to sleep, reminded of trauma etc.)
Mood gym - online help for anxiety
Smiling Mind app - takes you through different relaxation/meditation exercises
Stop, Breathe and Think app
Websites for when you want to… (be comforted, get a hug, avoid boredom, etc.)
Emergency Compliment
The Quiet Place Project
The Thoughts Room
Make everything okay
Masterpost of apps for mental health support
Moodscope - helps track your mood
If Self Harm / Suicide Ideation is an issue for you:Free self harm workbook // I want to self harm powerpoint // Play on Weave Silk // The Butterfly Project // International Association for Suicide Prevention // Alternatives to self harm // More alternatives to self harm // Reasons to live // More reasons to live // Even more reasons to live
Distractions
Grounding box
Start an art journal
Bad X-Factor auditions
Find a new hobby. This can help distract you when triggered.
Visit a museum
If you can’t get to a museum in real life, here are some online/virtual ones: British Museum online tours, Museum Victoria collections, Smithsonian Virtual Tours
Go to the zoo or an aquarium
Take part in operation beautiful
Stretch or start yoga
Dye your hair
Candy Box 2
Do some origami
Clean out, rearrange, redecorate your room
Get creative ideas from here
Neopets
Play cookie Clicker
Watch the stars
Try to beat Akinator
Free education!
Free MIT classes
Plan a relaxation day - no work, no homework, no pressure on yourself to do anything but relax. Have a bubble bath, invite a friend over, make a blanket fort, watch movies, stay in your pyjamas all day, have a picnic in your garden (or living room if you don’t have a big garden), etc.
50 ways to take a break
Make a mixtape
Climb a tree
Go on a picnic
Read a book
Free audiobooks
Have a bubble bath
Make a pet rock
listen to sounds
For Friends and Family of those with PTSD:How to help a friend who has been raped // What can I do? // What to do when someone is dissociating // 3 ways to help someone having a panic attack // 4 things you shouldn’t say to someone having a panic attack // How to help someone who is suicidal // How to be a friend to someone with PTSD

ptsdconfessions:

Become knowledgable about PTSD

What causes PTSD:

Symptoms of PTSD // Myths & Facts about PTSD // DSM 5 Criteria for PTSD // Complex PTSD

Overcoming PTSD is not a black and white process and it will take time. Try not to hold high expectations for yourself such as ‘If I do such and such I’ll be cured overnight!’. Unfortunately there is no magic cure for PTSD, but there are things we can do to help.
Remember that not every technique will work for everyone.

Therapy & Medication
Types of therapy:

Demonstration of a therapy appointment // Step-by-step how to get a therapist // Differences between types of therapists

Tips on picking a therapist // 50 signs of good therapy  // 50 warning signs of bad therapy

Online Therapy:

  • Blah therapy - costs $25+ per session to talk to professionals, can talk to everyday people for free.
  • 7 cups of tea - free as far as I can tell, but the people you talk to aren’t professionals, anyone can become a ‘listener’ after doing the short online class. This site is good as you can browse through all the ‘listener’ profiles to find someone who suits your time schedule and someone who has more experience with what you are going through.
  • Online therapy - $349 for 8 weeks to access their full services.
  • Anxiety online - can’t tell if it’s free or not.
  • E-therapy - the people you talk to are registered therapists, costs money but you have to make an enquiry to find out how much
  • Talk Space - free to begin with, then $25+ per week

Antidepressants and how they work // Medication for combat PTSD

Self Help Books
The Courage to Heal // The Way of the Journal // Healing from Trauma

FlashbacksDissociation & Anxiety

Other Helpful Resources
Surviving the holidays // Intimacy after trauma // Dissociation explained // Bullying forum (where you can talk about how bullying has affected you) // Self care after rape // Anxiety Self help // Why you aren’t bad for loving your abuser // Self care masterpost // Resources for male survivors // Help for men with PTSD // Emotions chart // Showering when you don’t feel up to it

Useful Apps & Websites

If Self Harm / Suicide Ideation is an issue for you:
Free self harm workbook // I want to self harm powerpoint // Play on Weave Silk // The Butterfly Project // International Association for Suicide Prevention // Alternatives to self harm // More alternatives to self harm // Reasons to live // More reasons to live // Even more reasons to live

Distractions

For Friends and Family of those with PTSD:
How to help a friend who has been raped // What can I do? // What to do when someone is dissociating // 3 ways to help someone having a panic attack // 4 things you shouldn’t say to someone having a panic attack // How to help someone who is suicidal // How to be a friend to someone with PTSD

(Source: ptsdconfessions)

— 2 hours ago with 163 notes
#for those that need this  #helpful links  #dont beat yourself up 
midwest-center:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder that can occur in people who have been exposed to a severe and traumatic physical or emotional event.
By Midwestcenter

midwest-center:

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder that can occur in people who have been exposed to a severe and traumatic physical or emotional event.

By Midwestcenter

— 3 hours ago with 243 notes
neurosciencestuff:

Treating Mental Illness by Changing Memories of Things Past
In the novel À larecherche du temps perdu (translated into English as Remembrance of Things Past), Marcel Proust makes a compelling case that our identities and decisions are shaped in profound and ongoing ways by our memories.
This truth is powerfully reflected in mental illnesses,like post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addictions. In PTSD, memories of traumas intrude vividly upon consciousness, causing distress, driving people to avoid reminders of their traumas, and increasing risk for addiction and suicide. In addiction, memories of drug use influence reactions to drug-related cues and motivate compulsive drug use.
What if one could change these dysfunctional memories? Although we all like to believe that our memories are reliable and permanent, it turns out that memories may indeed be plastic.
The process for modifying memories, depicted in the graphic, is called memory reconsolidation. After memories are formed and stored, subsequent retrieval may make them unstable. In other words, when a memory is activated, it also becomes open to revision and reconsolidation in a new form.
"Memory reconsolidation is probably among the most exciting phenomena in cognitive neuroscience today. It assumes that memories may be modified once they are retrieved which may give us the great opportunity to change seemingly robust, unwanted memories," explains Dr. Lars Schwabe of Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany. He and his colleagues have authored a review paper on the topic, published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry.
The idea of memory reconsolidation was initially discovered and demonstrated in rodents.
The first evidence of reconsolidation in humans was reported in a study in 2003, and the findings have since continued to accumulate. The current report summarizes the most recent findings on memory reconsolidation in humans and poses additional questions that must be answered by future studies.
"Reconsolidation appears to be a fundamental process underlying cognitive and behavioral therapies. Identifying its roles and mechanisms is an important step forward to fully harnessing the reconsolidation process in psychotherapy," said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.
The translation of the animal data to humans is a vital step for the potential application of memory reconsolidation in the context of mental disorders. Memory reconsolidation could open the door to novel treatment approaches for disorders such as PTSD or drug addiction.

neurosciencestuff:

Treating Mental Illness by Changing Memories of Things Past

In the novel À larecherche du temps perdu (translated into English as Remembrance of Things Past), Marcel Proust makes a compelling case that our identities and decisions are shaped in profound and ongoing ways by our memories.

This truth is powerfully reflected in mental illnesses,like post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addictions. In PTSD, memories of traumas intrude vividly upon consciousness, causing distress, driving people to avoid reminders of their traumas, and increasing risk for addiction and suicide. In addiction, memories of drug use influence reactions to drug-related cues and motivate compulsive drug use.

What if one could change these dysfunctional memories? Although we all like to believe that our memories are reliable and permanent, it turns out that memories may indeed be plastic.

The process for modifying memories, depicted in the graphic, is called memory reconsolidation. After memories are formed and stored, subsequent retrieval may make them unstable. In other words, when a memory is activated, it also becomes open to revision and reconsolidation in a new form.

"Memory reconsolidation is probably among the most exciting phenomena in cognitive neuroscience today. It assumes that memories may be modified once they are retrieved which may give us the great opportunity to change seemingly robust, unwanted memories," explains Dr. Lars Schwabe of Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany. He and his colleagues have authored a review paper on the topic, published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry.

The idea of memory reconsolidation was initially discovered and demonstrated in rodents.

The first evidence of reconsolidation in humans was reported in a study in 2003, and the findings have since continued to accumulate. The current report summarizes the most recent findings on memory reconsolidation in humans and poses additional questions that must be answered by future studies.

"Reconsolidation appears to be a fundamental process underlying cognitive and behavioral therapies. Identifying its roles and mechanisms is an important step forward to fully harnessing the reconsolidation process in psychotherapy," said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.

The translation of the animal data to humans is a vital step for the potential application of memory reconsolidation in the context of mental disorders. Memory reconsolidation could open the door to novel treatment approaches for disorders such as PTSD or drug addiction.

— 3 hours ago with 296 notes
nolongervictimsconfessionsmst:

Damn straight it is!  #quote #motivation #mentalillness #ptsd #nolongervictims

nolongervictimsconfessionsmst:

Damn straight it is! #quote #motivation #mentalillness #ptsd #nolongervictims

— 3 hours ago with 465 notes
"I’m not fighting to get ‘better,’ I’m fighting to get ‘back’ … The thing I’ve been missing all this time: myself."
— 3 hours ago with 774 notes
"Chronically traumatized children lose faith that good things can happen and people can be kind and trustworthy. They feel hopeless, often believing that the future will be as bad as the past, or that they will not live long enough to experience a good future. People who have a dissociative disorder may have different meanings in various dissociative parts. Some parts may be relatively balanced in their worldview, others may be despairing, believing the world to be a completely negative, dangerous place, while other parts might maintain an unrealistic optimistic outlook on life."
Suzette Boon, Coping with Trauma-Related Dissociation (via beatnicnazareth)
— 3 hours ago with 17 notes

angryasianfeminist:

*snuggles* *boops you on the nose* hey friend, you’re gonna be okay. I have faith in you. I’m so proud of you for making it this far because I know life can be difficult.

thefamilypixie
— 3 hours ago with 52 notes
"Your present circumstances don’t determine where you can go; they merely determine where you start."
Nido Qubein (via hopeful-and-depressed)
— 3 hours ago with 77 notes
liquid-diamonds-flowing:

This. This is EXACTLY what I needed today. 🙌👊👌 #regram @amazingameliahill #quotes #quoteoftheday #inspiration #motivation #life #positive #unstoppable #instaquote #inspo #beautaplin #wordstoliveby #healing #recovery

liquid-diamonds-flowing:

This. This is EXACTLY what I needed today. 🙌👊👌 #regram @amazingameliahill #quotes #quoteoftheday #inspiration #motivation #life #positive #unstoppable #instaquote #inspo #beautaplin #wordstoliveby #healing #recovery

— 3 hours ago with 127 notes